Dandelions’ Poinsettia Project

A year ago – December 2011 – Roseann, one of our designers, put a broken poinsettia stem into a bud-vase of water thinking it would give her a few days of pleasure before it died. Over a year later, surprising us all, this stem has survived…the leaves have faded in color, but it’s still alive! 

So this year Roseann has a new poinsettia stem in a bud vase, next to the old one, and we’ll see how long this one lasts!!

How are the poinsettias you bought this holiday doing? Hopefully, great!! Here’s how you can care for them and get them to re-bloom next season:

1. Keep caring for them as you have been during the holiday (Keeping them away from the cold, in warm rooms, and making sure they get enough water and lots of light.) If the leaves have already shriveled or fallen off, start watering your plant less.

New poinsettia bract2. In March (around the 17th – St. Patrick’s Day), when the bracts (colored leaves) fade, cut the stems back to 8 inches above the soil line.

3. Water your plant less than you’ve been watering it, allowing it to dry out more.

4. Lightly fertilize your plant with a balanced all-purpose plant food every 3-4 weeks.

5. When it warms up outside, place the plant outdoors – first in indirect sunlight, and then direct sunlight. Avoid temperatures under 50 degrees throughout the summer. When the new growth appears, water your plant more frequently.

6. In early July, around the 4th, cut back the new growth on the stems, and re-pot  the plant, if it needs it.

7. In early September, when fall temperatures begin to drop, move your poinsettia plant back inside, but make sure it gets 6 or more hours of direct light.

8. October 1st to December 1st, keep your plant in complete darkness for 14 hours, giving it 10 hours of natural light daily. This will set the buds and cause the bracts to color. Any exposure to light during the dark hours will delay blooming.

9. In  early December, stop fertilizing your poinsettia and start caring for it they way you did during the holiday.

Old and new poinsettiaGood luck on your poinsettia project. Let us know how your plant does. We’ll definitely keep you posted on Roseann’s poinsettia cuttings.

Poinsettia and Wreath Sale

In addition to our Christmas Sale Items, all poinsettias and holiday wreaths are on sale, too! All of the wreaths are $10 off while supplies last and the poinsettias range from $5-$10 off. Order fast because these won’t last long at this price! Offer valid on Eugene/Springfield delivery only. To view all of our Christmas options, click here.

T129-1A

Originally $49.99
ON SALE FOR $39.99

T122-1A

Medium Poinsettia Was $29.99
ON SALE FOR $24.99

T123-2A

Large Poinsettia Planter Basket
Was $74.99
ON SALE FOR $64.99

DLOL-7A GO DUCKS Wreath popup

Go DUCKS Wreath
perfect for your Fiesta Bowl Party
Was $49.99
ON SALE FOR $39.99

DLOL-7 Holiday Wreath popup

Holiday Wreath
Was $39.99
ON SALE FOR JUST $29.99

DLOL-6 Poinsettia reg

Large Christmas Poinsettia
Was $59.99
ON SALE FOR $49.99

How to Care for Your Poinsettia

Poinsettia -  Eugene, OregonThe vibrant red that poinsettias display (they also come in other shades including orange, cream, pink, even purple) have made them a popular plant around the Christmas season. But how do you care for this lovely plant? Here are some tips to help you get your poinsettia to last.

Temperature:

Poinsettias are tropical plants, so they don’t like the cold. During the day, be sure to keep it in a room that’s between 65 to 75 degrees, and at night, if possible, keep it in a room that’s a little cooler (55 to 60 degrees.) Poinsettias also don’t do well with sudden changes in temperature, so keep it away from the door so it doesn’t feel the draft, and if you keep it by the window, don’t allow the leaves to touch the glass. Sudden temperature changes will cause the poinsettia to drop it’s leaves. Poinsettias also like humidity, so if your plant’s leaves start looking a little crinkly around the edges, you can mist it.

Light:

Poinsettias love light, so make sure it gets as much as possible throughout the day.  dec 007

Watering:

Wait until the surface soil is dry to the touch and then water your poinsettia, allowing enough water so that it runs out of the drainage holes in the bottom of the container. Poinsettias prefer moist soil rather than sitting in water, so it is important that you allow the excess water to drain out after watering. Once a poinsettia starts to droop it will soon begin to drop it’s leaves, so it is important to check the soil frequently.

There is no need to fertilize your poinsettia plant during the Christmas season.

Contrary to popular belief, poinsettias are not poisonous to people or animals, but they are a delicate plant and their stems break easily, so be sure to keep them where a curious pet or child cannot reach them.

If you keep an eye on your poinsettia, it should last just fine throughout the season. In a few weeks I’ll let you know how to care for your poinsettia after the Christmas season.

Caring for your holiday Poinsettia

Photo used under Creative Commons from SusanReimer

A beautiful poinsettia plant is a wonderful addition to the home to decorate for Christmas. Whether you purchased one for yourself or have received one as a gift, questions often arise about how to best care for it. Poinsettias come primarily in red but are also available in white, pink and peppermint.

Here are some tips for keeping your poinsettia in top shape throughout the season:

Water: Check the soil daily and water if the soil is dry to the touch. If your poinsettia has been placed in a decorative pot or basket take the plant (still in its plastic container) and water over the sink allowing the water to drain out of the holes in the bottom. Then place the plant back in its pot or basket making sure the plant doesn’t sit in water.

Photo used by Creative Commons from ewen and donabel

Light: Lots of light are ideal for these tropical plants. South, west or east facing windows are preferable over a north facing window. Don’t let the poinsettia actually touch the window, however, as the cold pane will damage the plant.

Temperature: Poinsettias enjoy a consistent temperature of 65-70 degrees during daylight hours. Avoid placing the plant in areas that are exposed to hot or cool drafts (near a heater or door). At night, move the plant to a cooler location but not below 60 degrees.

Problems:

Wilting: A poinsettia without enough water will begin to droop. Give the plant a good soak and allow the water to fully drain out the bottom.

Leaf Drop: Although this is a natural process of the plant, premature leaf drop can be a sign that the plant is exposed to hot or cool drafts. Check its location and the temperature where it is placed.

Debunking the Poinsettia Toxicity Myth

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Poinsettias are beautiful,they’re  safe & they say “Christmas”. For years they have gotten a bad rap for being poisonous but extensive testing debunks this myth.  In addition to providing festive color, poinsettias are safe and can even be composted.

Here are some studies and their findings:

As with any non-food product, however, the poinsettia is not meant to be eaten and can cause varying degrees of discomfort; therefore, the plant should be kept out of the reach of young children and curious pets.

For additional information & to learn how to re-bloom your poinsettia check out aboutflowers.com