Spring Wedding Flowers

Although summer is the height of wedding season, more and more brides are choosing a spring wedding for their nuptials. If you’re wondering which flowers are best for your big day, here are a few suggestions: Ranunculus: These blooms are … Continue reading

Christmas Flower Ideas

Christmas is my favorite season.  I love the decorations, the lights, the music, the smell. As soon as the Thanksgiving turkey is made into leftovers I am pulling out our Christmas decorations and hopefully inspiring the same love of the Christmas season in my 4 year old daughter. Since we don’t have a fireplace she thinks Santa comes to the door and says “ding dong” to bring her presents!

Fresh flowers and plants make the holidays even brighter. Oregon is blessed to have a wide variety of fresh holiday greenery that bring the wonderful smell of Christmas to life. These days we meet requests for holiday flowers for everything from traditional centerpieces to fun and modern arrangements. Don’t hesitate to try something different this year! Here’s a little inspiration to get you started…

modern christmas centerpiece with tropical flowerschristmas amaryllis flowerscontemporary christmas flower arrangementchristmas centerpiece delivered eugene, orwinter flower arrangementtropical christmas flowers

Easter Flowers Announce Spring

Easter is such a fun time for flowers because spring showcases such amazing flowers that are only available locally, and for just a short time. After the cold and gray tones of winter, the colorful and soft pallets of spring colors are welcome. We love using these local flowers in our Easter flower arrangements. Pussy willow, anemones, ranunculus and tulips scream “Spring is here”!

The whole spring season and Easter in particular represents renewal and new life. As the first bulbs begin to burst from the soil, so too does the hope for warmer days and garden planting. We take nature’s lead and are inspired every day with spring’s bounty.

iris, hydrangea, roses, freesia roses, tulips, birdhouse tulips and gerbera daisies march 29 015 copypink and white flower arrangementdaffodil arrangement flowers delivered eugene

Care Tips for Your Spring Cut Flowers

After the winter weather, the warm days and clear skies we had this weekend were a tantalizing hint that the cold will be gone for good soon – at least for the season. Sunnier skies, warmer weather and fun, outdoor activities are on our doorstep! I spot my boots on the shoe rack and long to put them away until next winter. Even though the weather hasn’t quite caught up yet (it’s getting there!) spring is here, and so are the happy colors and delightful scents of spring flowers and bulbs.

So, when you come by and pick up a bunch of these bright beauties,  what do you need to know about them to keep them cheering your home longer?

Daffodils: Daffodils arranged in a vase all by themselves make for a cheery, eye-catching design. If, however, you want to arrange a bouquet with daffodils and other flowers, keep this in mind: daffodils secret a sap when their stem is cut. This does the daffodils no harm, but it will cause other flowers in the arrangement to wilt. So here’s what we do when making mixed arrangement of daffodils and other flowers: we cut the daffodils to the height we want them and put them in a separate vase of water for about an hour to allow the sap to drain. Then – without cutting their stems again – we rinse them and add them to our arrangement.

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Hyacinth: With their bright colors and sweet fragrance, hyacinth are very popular. When bringing hyacinth home for a cut-flower arrangement, don’t cut the woody, bottom part of the stem if you don’t have to. This helps the hyacinth draws up water, and it will last longer this way. If you’re working with hyacinth bulbs it’s a good idea to wear gloves. The bulbs are acidic and can cause skin irritation.

hyacinth        hyacinth 123

Tulips: Did you know that not only do their petals open and close depending on the temperature in a room, but tulips will continue to grow a few more inches after they’re cut? This movement in the design makes for a wild and alluring arrangement.

cezanne quote   friday

Anemones: When arranging with this beautiful, whimsical flower keep in mind that the petals will open in the light and warmth, so while anemones are pretty hardy, despite their delicate look, keeping them in a cool area in your home will help them last longer. Anemones will also continue to grow after they are cut!

anemones2  ane

 

 

Christmas Colors Inspire Me

I love the holiday season, but this year is especially spectacular. Not only did it snow this weekend, but the temperature in Eugene has stayed cold enough to keep it looking like a winter wonderland! A week into December, and with the lovely evergreens surrounding Eugene laden with the white, fluffy precipitation; the streets and rooftops snow-covered, the season has announced itself: Christmas is here!Dandelions Flowers & Gifts

This year, along with my usual reasons for loving the season – putting a tree up and dressing it up for the season; the festive decorations and lights around town; holiday shopping and wrapping (or bagging) gifts; anticipating fun family get-togethers; watching people go by all bundled up against the cold; Christmas music – I get to add a couple of  new ones to my list: the scrunch of footsteps in the snow; snow blowing off branches and swirling in the breeze against a blue winter sky. But I always come back to an old favorite: the red, white and green flowers we work with in the store. When the snow-tinted pine cones and Christmas greenery come out at work, it’s easy to get inspired, so I thought I’d give you a glimpse of some red, white and green floral inspiration at Dandelions:

Green and white kale adds fantastic texture to any arrangement you add it to.green and white kale

The big, beautiful and exotic blooms of cymbidium orchids with their deep red throats are a great attention-grabber.green cymbidium orchids

Deep red ranunculus, with its lovely, ruffly petals.deep red ranunculus

I never get tired of the wild allure of bells of Ireland. Their height is perfect for a showy, seasonal design.green bells of ireland

Red dogwood is also great for height in an arrangement. It’s woodsy red tint is perfect for the season.red dogwood branches

Red poinsettias are a Christmas icon! Their bold beauty add festivity to anyone’s holiday decor. red poinsettia

Exotic, bright red anthuriums, if you’re looking for something different, and dramatic!red antherium

Wintery-white fuji mums! white fuji mums

White poinsettias! Another winter holiday beauty!white poinsettias

I love the elegance that white dendrobium orchids bring to an arrangement.White dendrobium orchids

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas!snow dec 10

Charlotte and Thane

Over Labor Day weekend I designed for a wedding that was my favorite this season. This was partly because of the gorgeous mix of colors and flowers but mostly because Charlotte, the bride, was such a doll. I enjoyed working with her and her family on her bridal shower, rehearsal dinner and wedding flowers. Charlotte gave me free range when it came to flower varieties- she just wanted the overall look to be colorful…but muted. I spent many nights lying in bed contemplating the perfect combination to create the color palette. Trying to achieve a feeling that colors had been left out in the sun and faded took some thought. Many flower varieties (especially dahlias and garden roses) vary in color intensity throughout the growing season so I constantly had my eye on what the growers were bringing each week to make sure my selection was correct.

Since the wedding was at Deep Woods, which is a rustic venue, I wanted the flowers to feel at home in that atmosphere. Maidenhair fern, rosemary and sage as greenery brought in the woodsy feel and aspidistra leaves added a more upscale feel to the centerpieces. Charlotte’s bouquet included: “Juliet” David Austen roses, “Flame” mini calla lilies, magenta freesia, purple veronica, magenta carnations, green cymbidium orchids, “Jitterbug” dahlias, “Pooh” dahlias, zinnias, cockscomb and more.

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The reception centerpieces were each slightly different but a fantastic mix of colors and seasonal flower varieties. Charlotte also had bathroom flowers, bar flowers and buffet table flowers. Down the aisle I placed single blossoms of dahlias with colored burlap ribbon twirled inside the hanging vases. Instead of a traditional flower arch that is usually seen on wedding arches or pergolas blossoms of cymbidium orchids, roses and carnations were strung to create flower garlands. This looked great and added to the modern but rustic feel.

A huge THANK YOU to Charlotte for letting me be a part of your big day and Congratulations!

Local Grower Spotlight: Bare Mountain Farms

Nothing makes a florist happier than having amazing floral products delivered fresh from a local farm. Each week we wait to see what Tony from Bare Mountain Farms brings us and are never disappointed in the varieties, quality and color of his flowers.

Bare Mountain is located in Shedd, Oregon and uses organic and sustainable practices to produce high quality flowers.  They are strictly no-till meaning they don’t till their soil and thus help the soil retain its organic matter. Tony is so knowledgeable about his product and clearly finds joy in sharing his knowledge with those who have a desire to learn. It’s amazing how dedicated these farmers are to growing- especially being organic. It takes a TON of work. We get the most awesome job of crafting designs with the final product of their labor.

Designing with some of Bare Mountain flowers

Beds of sweet peas in the hoop houses

This must smell AMAZING!

Tulips beds beginning to sprout

Tony takes his dedication to a whole new level using a scythe to cut grass

Ready for planting!

They make their own compost tea for fertilizer

Anemones…a bridal favorite

Like I said, we are like children at Christmas when Tony arrives with his weekly choices and all oooh and aaah over them. They grow quite an array of blooms including sweet peas, ranunculus, lilies, anemones, snapdragons, dianthus, zinnias, dahlias and more. I can’t wait to get up to the farm in person and see the process and plantings in person.

Images used by permission from Bare Mountain Farms.

Pantone’s Color of the Year: Emerald-Green

Photo used under Creative Commons from GlitzUK

PANTONE recently announced the 2013 color of the year as PANTONE® 17-5641 Emerald. PANTONE has long been the authority on color trends and their decision to name emerald as the color for this year reflects the desire for renewal and growth.

Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®, reminds us that “Green is the most abundant hue in nature – the human eye sees more green than any other color in the spectrum”. How true for flowers! Often green is only seen in the foliage but why shouldn’t it play center stage? Anthurium, Bells of Ireland, spider mums and even roses all come in shades of green (although not truly emerald) but certainly complement the deep gem shade.

If you can’t wait to incorporate emerald into your upcoming event or wedding, PANTONE suggests pairing it with shades of peach, pinks, roses, ruby reds and aubergines. I also think navy complements it well since it is such a sophisticated palette.

Anni3_high GreenEssent1_high DLOL-190 Candy Cane Delight 003

How to Care for Your Poinsettia

Poinsettia -  Eugene, OregonThe vibrant red that poinsettias display (they also come in other shades including orange, cream, pink, even purple) have made them a popular plant around the Christmas season. But how do you care for this lovely plant? Here are some tips to help you get your poinsettia to last.

Temperature:

Poinsettias are tropical plants, so they don’t like the cold. During the day, be sure to keep it in a room that’s between 65 to 75 degrees, and at night, if possible, keep it in a room that’s a little cooler (55 to 60 degrees.) Poinsettias also don’t do well with sudden changes in temperature, so keep it away from the door so it doesn’t feel the draft, and if you keep it by the window, don’t allow the leaves to touch the glass. Sudden temperature changes will cause the poinsettia to drop it’s leaves. Poinsettias also like humidity, so if your plant’s leaves start looking a little crinkly around the edges, you can mist it.

Light:

Poinsettias love light, so make sure it gets as much as possible throughout the day.  dec 007

Watering:

Wait until the surface soil is dry to the touch and then water your poinsettia, allowing enough water so that it runs out of the drainage holes in the bottom of the container. Poinsettias prefer moist soil rather than sitting in water, so it is important that you allow the excess water to drain out after watering. Once a poinsettia starts to droop it will soon begin to drop it’s leaves, so it is important to check the soil frequently.

There is no need to fertilize your poinsettia plant during the Christmas season.

Contrary to popular belief, poinsettias are not poisonous to people or animals, but they are a delicate plant and their stems break easily, so be sure to keep them where a curious pet or child cannot reach them.

If you keep an eye on your poinsettia, it should last just fine throughout the season. In a few weeks I’ll let you know how to care for your poinsettia after the Christmas season.

Modern Christmas Fresh Floral Designs

Having fresh flowers during the Christmas season is a wonderful tradition that makes the home feel extra festive. Whether you are buying them for yourself (highly recommended) or as a gift for someone else, here are some of my favorite holiday arrangements.

  silver and white christmas flowers   Christmas flower arrangement